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Philippe Petit & Vultures Quartet – Tourbillon d’Obscurité

Philippe Petit & Vultures Quartet – Tourbillon d’Obscurité

by Rexington Steel

Countries:  
Bandlink: Philippe Petit  Vultures Quartet
Label: Sub Rosa
Genre: Experimental/Ambient Noise

01 Souffle
02 Poussiere
03 Baiser Leger
04 Bec d’Eau
05 Tourbillon

Unlike having to go through such an intense array of styles the last time it was up to me to review one of Philippe Petit’s last heavy sets of collaborations, this time around, things are more subdued. Things are also a lot more serious. I feel I’m very fortunate to have experienced this particular gathering led by Mr. P. because some of the best qualities from past collaborations have translated well to this disc. This time around, there is a sense of focus, and the focus is on keeping everything spaced out, allowing the time to let everyone’s efforts fully evolve and progress. As tonally diverse as this recording is, there is an underlying mark from which the mood of the piece never quavers.

All tracks are gonna give off the same vibe should you care to listen, but what is great is that, thanks to the diversity of the sounds, you probably wont be bored. All tracks here are longer than seven and a half minutes, and this has most likely contributed to the fact that letting everyone indulge in the track making process has made this release what it is. Some of the best moments here include a powerful guitar track that drones and stretches over layers of both metallic and synthesized noise on the second track, “Poussiere”, and strangely enough, there is a sudden drop in the huge wall of sound, and then it becomes a minimal affair with what sounds like the blowing of a hollowed out horn. What is awesome from that point is that the next, and longest track follows suit quite well, as for the duration of the almost eighteen minutes, one hears what might well be a prolonged ritual of some sort. The sounds are still electronically driven for the most part, but there is a very human element to it. Seems like the Quartet really has a handle on things when it comes to improvising. “Bec d’Eau” is the most emotive of all the work. This track sees a continuation of the almost ancient feel of the track and a half before it.

This track is also the most mysterious of the five because of this, sounding at times like so many swords being unsheathed inside a cathedral where a pipe organ is being played, others, like a surreal dream with a Mongolian fiddle being played backwards. This is definitely the strongest track of the five. This was very unexpected for me. I know am able to discern more than before just what it is Phillipe loves to lay down on his works, and why it seems to work so efficiently with practically everyone he works with. Maybe the man simply knows what true musical partnerships are all about, and he knows just what will make for a great collaboration. Very nicely done! There is balance and harmony to be found in this work.

Rating: 3/5

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